Free Wildlife Talks and Workshops at your School

We visit schools* to provide free of charge assemblies, talks and workshops to raise awareness about endangered wildlife and conservation.

At DSWF we believe that the young people of today are the wildlife guardians of tomorrow. We aim to inform, encourage and inspire children, in the hope that when they grow up, they will have an interest in the natural world that will last a lifetime!

Our list of key stage appropriate talks and workshops, along with the curriculum links, can be found by clicking on the boxes below.

To make a booking or for any questions you may have, please email DSWF’s Education Manager Jo Elphick – jo.elphick@davidshepherd.org

Please note: Geographical restrictions may apply to school visits.

*Talks for cubs, scouts, brownies, guides etc. and adult groups are also available on request.


You may also be interested in Global Canvas, our annual children’s art competition – A free group entry competition with the final held at the Natural History Museum! If you are interested in choosing us as your school’s charity of the year, you can find out more by contacting DSWF’s Education Manager Jo Elphick – jo.elphick@davidshepherd.org


Teachers’ Feedback

We loved the interaction in the assembly… The link to habitats was perfect because it covers all three year group’s science curriculum”.
Gemma Stevenson, Ewhurst School

The children were so inspired, they started to write tiger facts and we had a tiger themed show and tell. Your session was perfect, just the right length of time on the carpet and the mask making was great”.
Maria Mayes, Woodlea Primary

It was lovely having you and the children really enjoyed the session… it was very organised, the right length for the children’s age and lovely activities. I am already thinking about next year!”.
Carla Scarpato, St Francis Ventnor, March 2018

Feedback from the kids!

We had fun making the animal habitats… when I grow up I want to work at an animal charity and help animals

I really enjoyed your talk about the endangered animals and I never knew that there were not many tigers left